Usain Bolt ‘not happy’ about being stripped of gold medal…

(under picture of 2008 relay team) Men’s 4x100m relay Asafa Powell, Usain Bolt, Michael Frater, Nesta Carter of Jamaica celebrate after winning the final of the athletics competition in the National Stadium during the Beijing 2008 Olympic Games August 22, 2008. Usain Bolt has lost one of his nine…ub1Usain Bolt says his legacy has not been tarnished by having to hand back one of his nine Olympic gold medals after Jamaican teammate Nesta Carter tested positive for a banned substance.

The 30-year-old also says he does not have a problem with Carter, who was part of the Jamaican quartet that won the 4x100m in Beijing in 2008.

“It’s rough that I have to give back one of my medals,” he told Reuters.

“I’m not happy, but it’s just one of those things that happen in life.”

Bolt completed a ‘triple triple’ in Rio last summer, winning gold in the 100m, 200m and 4x100m relay to add to his successes in the same events in 2008 and 2012.ub2“I think I’ve still accomplished a lot – it hasn’t changed what I have done throughout my career,” said the 100m and 200m world record-holder. “I have worked hard and pushed and done things that no-one has done before.”

Carter, 31, was also part of the squad that won the event in London five years ago and helped Jamaica win at the World Championships in 2011, 2013 and 2015.

A retest of his sample from the 2008 Games was found to contain a banned stimulant.

He ran the first leg in Beijing for Jamaica’s sprint relay team, which also included Bolt, Michael Frater, Asafa Powell and Dwight Thomas, who ran in the heats.

“I’m not going to despise anybody for anything,” Bolt told The Gleaner. “Nesta and I are still friends. We came up through the ranks in high school, so we’re still friends, and I really don’t have a problem with Nesta.”ub3The Jamaican Olympic Association may appeal against the decision, while Carter’s lawyer confirmed on Wednesday that the sprinter will lodge his own appeal with the Court of Arbitration for Sport.

Bolt was non-committal about whether he would financially contribute to Carter’s appeal.

“That’s up to my management, there are a lot of variables so we will discuss that and see where we go from there,” he added.

(under picture of Usain) Aug 19, 2016; Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; Usain Bolt (JAM) after the 4 x 100m relay final during track and field competition in the Rio 2016 Summer Olympic Games at Estadio Olimpico Joao Havelange.

Usain Bolt admitted that he’s not happy to have been stripped of a gold medal following a teammate’s positive test for a banned substance.

Bolt told Andre Lowe of the Jamaica Gleaner that he was disappointed to lose the medal, which he won as Jamaica’s relay team at the 2008 Summer Games in Beijing, but would consider helping with an appeal.ub6“It’s rough that I have to give back one of my medals and I already gave it back because it was of course required by the IOC,” Bolt said. “I’m not happy about it but it’s just one of those things that happen in life but I can’t allow that to deter me from my focus this season, so I am focused but I am not pleased about the situation.”

Bolt doesn’t think the loss of the medal will have an impact on his overall legacy.

“I think I’ve still accomplished a lot, this hasn’t changed what I have done throughout my career,” Bolt said. “I have worked hard and pushed and done things that no one has done before. I have won three gold medals over the 100m and 200m, which no one has ever done before.

As for an appeal to the Court of Arbitration for Sport, which could cost as much as $13 million, Bolt didn’t rule out assisting in that effort.ub5Nesta Carter (right with Usain Bolt) was told of the adverse finding in May – before the Rio Olympics

“That’s up to my management. There are a lot of variables so we will discuss that and see where we go from there, but if it’s necessary (I will help),” Bolt said.

Nesta Carter, Bolt’s teammate on the 2008 relay team, was retroactively punished for testing positive for a banned substance. That means Bolt’s career total of Olympic gold medals drops from nine to eight.

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